A recent Pew Research article pinpointed major concerns with social media platforms. “Americans have complicated feelings about their relationship with big technology companies,” the article observes. “While they have appreciated the impact of technology over recent decades and rely on these companies’ products to communicate, shop and get news, many have also grown critical of the industry.” The article goes on to report that a Pew Research Center survey found that “roughly three-quarters of U.S. adults say it is very (37%) or somewhat (36%) likely that social media sites intentionally censor political viewpoints that they find objectionable. Just 25% believe this is not likely the case.” The events of the last few weeks have made that article appear almost prophetic as issues of censorship and privacy have gained additional prominence on the world stage. A number of private and public companies are working to resolve these issues, with many of those companies relying on blockchain to provide their services. Leading the pack is BIGtoken, the first consumer-managed data marketplace where people can own and earn from their data. The opportunity ahead has such potential that parent company SRAX Inc. (NASDAQ: SRAX) is spinning out BIGtoken into a separate publicly traded company and has entered into a definitive share exchange agreement with Force Protection Video Equipment Corp. (OTC: FPVD). The separation of BIGtoken provides shareholders a pure play in the consumer-managed data sector. SRAX benefits from the potential upside of the BIGtoken platform while reducing operating costs. Social media behemoths such as Facebook Inc. (NASDAQ: FB) and Twitter Inc. (NYSE: TWTR) are under pressure to identify and remove hate-filled communication along with taking added measures to protect consumer data. Blockchain companies such as Riot Blockchain Inc. (NASDAQ: RIOT) could benefit from increased implementation of blockchain technology to protect consumers, safeguard information and ensure data privacy. Everyone’s at risk as revealed by the recent Solarwinds hack, which compromised not just local, state and federal agencies but also major tech companies as well.

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